Lisa Monaco, Assistant to President Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Visits ODNI and Tours CTIIC

Lisa Monaco, Assistant to President Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Visits ODNI and Tours CTIIC

Wednesday, 20 July 2016 14:46


Lisa Monaco Visits ODNI, Tours CTIIC

By Brian Murphy

ODNI Public Affairs


Lisa Monaco, assistant to the president for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, visited the Office of the Director of National Intelligence at their Liberty Crossing complex, McLean, Va., July 19.

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(From left to right) DNI James Clapper, Tonya Ugoretz, Lisa Monaco and Stephanie O’Sullivan pose for a photo during Monaco’s visit to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence at their Liberty Crossing complex, McLean, Va., July 19.
(Photo by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)

During her visit, Monaco met with then Director of National Intelligence James Clapper before receiving a briefing and tour of the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center from Tonya Ugoretz, CTIIC’s director.

Monaco, who advised the President on all aspects of counterterrorism policy and strategy as well as the coordination of all homeland security-related activities throughout the Executive Branch, was pleased to meet with members of the workforce during her first visit to CTIIC.

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Lisa Monaco toured CTIIC in McLean, VA to meet Director Tonya Ugoretz and the staff
(Photo by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)

“I wanted to make sure I had an opportunity to thank everyone here at CTIIC for all of the hard work they have done,” Monaco said. “The center plays an important role in our nation’s security, making sure policymakers have an integrated picture of the cyber threats facing our nation.”

CTIIC builds understanding of foreign cyber threats to U.S. national interests to inform decision-making by federal cyber centers, departments and agencies, and policymakers.

When Monaco delivered a keynote speech during the “Strengthening our Nation’s Cyber Defenses” event in Washington, D.C., last year, she explained why CTIIC was created.

“Currently, no single government entity is responsible for producing coordinated cyber threat assessments, ensuring that information is shared rapidly among existing cyber centers and other elements within the government, and supporting the work of operators and policy makers with timely intelligence about the latest cyber threats and threat actors,” Monaco said. “The CTIIC is intended to fill these gaps.”

"The CTIIC will not collect intelligence—it will analyze and integrate information already collected under existing authorities," she added at the time.

Director Tonya Ugoretz said, “We appreciated the opportunity to update Ms. Monaco on how CTIIC, with its multiagency workforce, is building relationships with the federal cyber community to provide integrated assessments that set our adversaries’ cyber activity in a broader context.”

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(Lisa Monaco visited CTIIC  for briefings on cyber integration and analysis from Director Tonya Ugoretz.
(Photo by Brian Murphy, ODNI Public Affairs)

In 2015, President Barack Obama signed a presidential memorandum directing the DNI to establish CTIIC, which received congressional authorization and funding in the December omnibus bill. The center’s five responsibilities outlined in the presidential memorandum are:

  • Provide integrated all-source analysis of intelligence related to foreign cyber threats or related to cyber incidents affecting U.S. national interests.
  • Support the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center, the National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force, U.S. Cyber Command, and other relevant U.S. government entities by providing access to intelligence necessary to carry out their respective missions.
  • Oversee the development and implementation of intelligence sharing capabilities (including systems, programs, policies and standards) to enhance shared situational awareness of intelligence related to foreign cyber threats or related to cyber incidents affecting U.S. national interests.
  • Ensure that indicators of malicious cyber activity and, as appropriate, related threat reporting contained in intelligence channels are downgraded to the lowest classification possible for distribution to both U.S. government and private sector entities through the mechanism described in section 4 of Executive Order 13636 of February 12, 2013 (Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity).
  • Facilitate and support interagency efforts to develop and implement coordinated plans to counter foreign cyber threats to U.S. national interests using all instruments of national power, including diplomatic, economic, military, intelligence, homeland security, and law enforcement activities.
 

Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center