News Articles

News Articles

The night before a roadside bomb detonated against his Humvee, Ryan McCallum knew something was amiss.

 

The Illinois Army National Guard soldier had an uneasy feeling that night and didn’t sleep well. The standard intelligence briefing he and his crew received about the route to and from the airbase in the middle of Iraq was not helpful.

 

But when he got on the road that morning in Iraq in June 2007, his anxiety deepened. A sandstorm was kicking up. Tires on the side of the road were burning. Something just wasn’t right; none of this was “normal.”

 

Friday, 18 September 2020 12:11

Diversity Lags at Top of U.S. Spy Agencies

For years, U.S. spy agencies have acknowledged they need a more diverse workforce to help understand increasingly complex threats and interpret foreign cultures.They are making progress toward that goal—except at the top.

 

Years of studies, recommendations and promises have had limited impact on reshaping the upper echelons of the U.S. intelligence community, comprising 17 civilian and military agencies and offices, according to current and former officials and workforce statistics.

 

“I remember that day as clearly as yesterday.”

 

It has been 19 years since the tragic attacks in New York, NY, Arlington, VA, and Shanksville, PA. Nearly 3,000 of our friends, family members, neighbors and colleagues never made it home that night.

 

For David Pan, a career intelligence officer who was inside the Pentagon on the fateful morning of September 11, 2001, these events changed his life forever. Pan was fortunate to make it out of the Pentagon alive; however, the emotional impact the day made on him is everlasting.

 

For auto racing fans around the world, the Indianapolis 500 evokes images of cars whizzing around the historic track at speeds north of 230 miles per hour. This century-old event held annually at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway is known as the “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.”

 

What’s not known by many is the Indianapolis 500 has served as an important testing ground for America’s Intelligence Community and national security apparatus.

 

“Despite being shot in the back, war was the best experience I’ve ever had.”

 

Those are the words of a 30-year-old man who has spent more than 10 percent of his life in a military hospital recovering from an armor piercing sniper round.

 

His name is Justin Griffin, a former Sergeant in the United States Army who is a Purple Heart recipient and a current employee at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI).

 

Page 1 of 47