Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy and Transparency

How We Work

Intelligence Community Directive 126 - Implementation Procedures for the Signals Intelligence Redress Mechanism under Executive Order 14086

 

Executive Order 14086 established a new process for individuals to seek redress regarding alleged covered violations of law with respect to signals intelligence activities concerning their data that has been transferred from a qualifying state to the United States. Intelligence Community Directive 126: Implementation Procedures for the Signals Intelligence Redress Mechanism under Executive Order 14086 specifies the process by which qualifying complaints may be transmitted by an appropriate public authority in a qualifying state pursuant to Executive Order 14086. Additionally, and pursuant to the same Executive Order, this Directive authorizes and sets forth the process through which the ODNI Civil Liberties Protection Officer (CLPO) shall investigate, review, and, as necessary, order appropriate remediation for a covered violation regarding qualifying complaints; communicate the conclusion of such investigation to the complainant through the appropriate public authority in a qualifying state and in a manner that protects classified or otherwise privileged or protected information; and provide necessary support to the U.S. Data Protection Review Court.

 

Section E.1.c and E.1.d of the Directive detail the requirements necessary for a complaint to constitute a qualifying complaint. Pursuant to the Executive Order, complainants seeking to use this redress process may not submit complaints directly to the CLPO, but must instead file their complaint with the appropriate public authority of a qualifying state who will verify both the sufficiency of the complaint and the identity of the complainant. The Attorney General designates pursuant to the Executive Order which countries or regional economic integration organizations are “qualifying states.” Qualifying states must designate an appropriate public authority for the submission of a complaint. Further information will be provided through this website once qualifying states and their appropriate public authorities have been designated.

Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy and Transparency

Transparency 

 
The Principles of Intelligence Transparency for the Intelligence Community are intended to facilitate IC decisions on making information publicly available in a manner that enhances public understanding of intelligence activities, while continuing to protect information when disclosure would harm national security.

These Principles do not modify or supersede applicable laws, executive orders, and directives, including Executive Order 13526, Classified National Security Information. Instead, they articulate the general norms that elements of the IC should follow in implementing those authorities and requirements.

On October 27, 2015, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence published the implementation plan for the Principles of Intelligence Transparency for the Intelligence Community. The implementation plan sets intelligence community priorities for transparency, translating the principles into concrete, measurable initiatives.

Below are several useful documents related to the Transparency initiative:



CONTENT TO COME

Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy and Transparency

Fact Sheets



The following fact sheet describes this IC Governance Framework in detail, outlining the sources of imposed requirements and detailing how all three branches of government are involved. This is the first in a series – please check back soon for additional fact sheets on Section 702, FISA, the USA Freedom Act, and CLPT.

The ODNI Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy, and Transparency (CLPT) works to ensure that the Intelligence Community carries out its national security mission in a manner that protects privacy and civil liberties, while providing appropriate transparency to the public. This is part of the broader, multi-layered framework of U.S. rules and oversight, designed to ensure that we exercise our authorities and use our capabilities properly. This “IC Governance Framework” establishes a set of rules that the IC follows as it conducts its activities, ensuring that we uphold our duties to the Constitution.
 
IC Governance Fact Sheet


The Civil Liberties Protection Officer

Ben Huebner is the Civil Liberties Protection Officer for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. In that capacity, he leads the ODNI's Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy and Transparency, and reports directly to the Director of National Intelligence.

 

Civil Liberties and Privacy Intelligence Community Enterprise Strategy 2019-2024
Provides the CLPT's strategic roadmap for enhancing the IC’s framework for protecting civil liberties and privacy, highlighting four high-level goals relating to civil liberties and privacy to obtain the trust of the American people. The goals focus on protecting civil liberties and privacy through policy implementation, ensuring compliance with the Constitution and laws, handling complaints of possible abuses of civil liberties, and providing transparency.

Intelligence Community Directive 107: Civil Liberties, Privacy, and Transparency

This Directive establishes Intelligence Community policy for protecting civil liberties and privacy and for providing greater transparency that enhances public understanding of, and trust in, the IC mission, its governance framework, and intelligence activities as defined in EO 12333.



 

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ODNI’s Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy and Transparency (CLPT) created this “transparency tracker” document to track, categorize, and chart the information being released to the public on IC on the Record for the purpose of assisting the public in identifying and retrieving relevant information, facilitating research, and gauging the effectiveness of the IC’s transparency efforts since August 2013. Because IC on the Record is an important public outreach tool for the IC, analyzing the amount and types of information publicly released on IC on the Record provides a helpful and comprehensive way to assess the IC’s progress in enhancing transparency. Specifically, this transparency tracker consists of a series of statistical summary charts followed by a detailed index of documents.

 

National Counterintelligence and Security Center